Welcome to “Sunday SchoolSunday School”.  Each week we will highlight our Adult Class Sunday School Lesson for the upcoming week.  This site is designed to prepare you for the upcoming lesson, and give you greater insight into the Word of God.  Get ready to bestretched.  Get ready for an exciting  journey.  Get ready for a stir in your Soul.

 

Daily Scripture reading for the week is at the end of the page.           

 

                                                                                                                                                                                Dr. June Normil

 


 

 

                                            Unit 2 Study 12

                                        November 23, 2014

 

Study Scriptures for this week's Lesson: Luke 15:1-24

 

Key Verse: Luke 15:10 I [Jesus] say unto you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth  (KJV).

 

Central Truth: Christ seeks and saves the lost.

 

Our Focus: To give thanks for Christ's love for the lost and endeavor to bring the unsaved to Him.

 

 

                                            Stories about Finding the Lost

 

 

                                                                                         

Introducing the study

 

Every person falls into one of two spiritual categories: lost or found. It is true that we are all at various points on our spiritual journeys, but we all fit this definition, fundamentally. It  is critical for believers to recognize this simple reality. This week's study will help you appreciate the immensity of the spiritual need around you and be exhorted to embrace your role in seeing that the lost are found. At the end of this study, you will: (1). Recognize the importance of seeking out the lost and leading them to Jesus. (2). Acknowledge the diligence necessary for those seeking to reach the lost. (3).Comprehend more thoroughly the immensity of the spiritual need around you.

 

Finding a Lost Sheep

 

Christians must be cautious about our attitudes toward those who do not know the Lord. While their sin should repulse us, our hearts should yearn for them to repent and find salvation. Never should we snub the lost. Better that we should love them as the Savior does. Jesus attracted people who were rejected because of their sin (Luke 15:1). This brought criticism against Him. The religious leaders grumbled at how He openly associated with the sinners they had rejected (verse 2). Their murmurs prompted Jesus to tell a series of three parables, revealing three aspects of the same truth: God welcomes repentant sinners, and so should we. The first story involved a shepherd od a hundred sheep. One became lost, so the shepherd left the ninety-nine and diligently sought the one that was lost (verses 3-4). Having found the sheep, the shepherd rejoiced, calling for family and friends to share in his joy (verses 5-6). Jesus said that rejoicing fills heaven over one lost sinner's repentance (verse 7). And the principle behind His parable should clearly speak to those of us who know the Lord. While God loves believers, and no doubt cherishes our relationship with Him, He rejoices when one lost soul leaves the sinful life. We, then, ought never to be like the Pharisees and scribes by looking down on the lost. We should instead copy the attitude of the shepherd, who searched for his lost sheep until he found it.

 

[For Personal Reflection] How does the image of a lost sheep relate to people lost in sin?   

 

Finding a Lost Coin

 

Jesus proceeded to a story about a lost coin, part of a  larger collection of ten coins (verse 8). The owner of the coins valued each one, and immediately launched an intensive search when a single coin turned up missing. Finding that lost coin became imperative. Once she found it, she, like the shepherd in the previous parable, launched into enthusiastic rejoicing (verse 9). She quickly spread the good news. It was a time of celebration. So it is in heaven, Jesus said, when one lost person comes to God in repentance (verse 10). Can we who know Christ as Savior and Lord do any less? The salvation of a sinful person should never seem routine to us. We should instead view it as cause to praise the Lord.

 

[For Personal Reflection] How can this parable help you better grasp how God feels about you? 

 

Finding a Lost Son

 

In the third parable, Jesus put the truth of Luke 15 into very personal, human terms. The story involved a man who had two sons. One day, the younger of the two approached his dad demanding his inheritance. Normally, this would come after the death of the father. But this son wanted immediately (verses 11-12). Money in hand, the younger son left home to live a wild life of sin in a distant land. He eventually found himself destitute, his inheritance wasted on the life he had foolishly chosen (verse 13) To make matters worse, a severe famine gripped the area (verse 14). This downturn of events sent the younger son looking for employment. He found it, in the despised occupation of feeding  pigs (verse 15). The son was extremely hungry that even the pig's food looked appealing and he though about eating it (verse 16). Without food or family, the young man faced rock bottom. Only then did he come to his senses. The young man thought about the better life he had at home. This  brought him to a decision: He would return home, admit his failure, and seek employment from his father as a hired worker (verses 18-19). The younger  son went home and to his surprise, his father eagerly met him as he approached. While the younger son gave his father the speech he had prepared, his father welcomed him warmly (verses 20-22). To the son's surprise, the father called for a party to celebrate this homecoming. The son was restored to the position of authority and honor he had previously held. This story relates in emotional terms what Jesus had been saying in the previous two stories: The repentance of a sinner should result in rejoicing. We are all surrounded by lost souls in need of salvation. As God's people, we have been called to joyfully  and lovingly lead those wayward individuals to a right relationship with Him.

 

[For Personal reflection] How is turning to Christ like coming home from a miserable, distant land?

 

 Discipleship in Action

 

You may be surrounded by people who are lost--whether they realize it or not. Like the lost sheep, they have wandered away from God and cannot find their way to Him. Like the lost coin, they are a treasure to God but separated from Him. Like the lost son, they desperately need to return to the Father. You can help these lost people. You can reach out to them in love with the gospel of Christ. You can show them godly friendship and compassion. Let  these stories of "lost and found" motivate you to  guide them toward Jesus. Perhaps you have  realized in the course of this study that you are lost. Make your way to Christ. In Him, you will find a new life, greater than you ever could imagine. 
  

                                                                COME TO JESUS...HE'S WAITING!                                                   

                          
 
 

 

 

 Monday               Jesus, the Messiah-Savior.                   Isaiah 53:1-12

 

 

 

Tuesday               Salvation of the Gentiles.                      Isaiah 60:1-5

 

 

 

Wednesday         God's Mercy to Sinners.                      Jonah 3:1-10               

 

 

Thursday           Jesus, the Good Shepherd.                       John 10:10-18                        

 

 

 

Friday                 All Saved by Grace.                                Acts 15:1-11                   

 

 

 

Saturday            Seeking the Salvation of Sinners.           1 Cor. 9:16-22                                               

 

   

 See You In Sunday School Next Week!!!! 

 

   

Copyright Reference:  Radiant Life, Volume 96 Number 1 Sep. Oct. Nov 2014 by Gospel Publishing House, 1445 N. Boonville Ave, Springfield, Mo  65802.

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                Dr. June Normil